We invited the media today for this news conference because we find it strange and potentially dangerous that the most reasonable solution that was tabled by the VCRAC Crabbe panel for giving Ghana a credible register for credible elections in 2016 appears to have been totally ignored by the Electoral Commission. We, therefore, want to draw attention to this and ask you, journalists, the Fourth Estate of the Realm, to demand urgent answers from the Electoral Commission on the fate of the wise proposal from the EC’s own panel of experts for the introduction of validation for the voters’ register. Full Publication

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Census figures needless for biometric registration - EC
The Electoral Commission of Ghana has allayed fears that the 2010 Census figures, which are yet to be released, will affect the biometric voter registration exercise starting March 24. The Danquah Institute in a statement emphasised the need for the release of the census figures saying the statistics will serve as a useful weapon to deal with voter registration fraud such as registration of minors and foreigners.
DI Proposes Electoral Reforms
The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute, Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, at symposium organized by the think tank to critique the Supreme Court judgement in the election petition, has proposed at number of reforms aimed at improving the Electoral Laws of Ghana ahead of the 2016 elections and subsequent elections. Mr Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, who was a speaker at the symposium, stated that there is an urgent need for a constitutional review of the Electoral Commission with regards to the appointment process, the tenure of appointees of the officers of the Electoral Commission, the composition of its membership, and the accountability mechanisms of the EC.
Akufo-Addo meets David Cameron over 2012 elections and gay issues
The 2012 Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party NPP), Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, met with British Prime Minister, David Cameron, MP, last Thursday. Nana Akufo-Addo was in London for the two-day (November 10-11, 2011) 11th Party Leaders’ Meeting of the International Democrat Union (IDU), hosted by the UK Conservative Party.
Petroleum price subsidy unavoidable but who pays for it?
The debate over petroleum subsidy often evokes emotions, accusations and counter accusations. The latest withdrawal of subsidies on petroleum products in Ghana is not different. Predictably, petroleum politics have always led to political tensions and in some cases political instability. But the reality is that international crude oil prices, a major determinant of petroleum product prices is out of the control of importing countries. The Governments of these countries must therefore formulate policies including sustainable subsidy schemes that address market objectives without compromising political and social stability.
IMF Concludes Article IV Consultation Mission to Ghana
A mission from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), led by Christina Daseking, visited Accra during April 2-12, 2013, to conduct discussions for the 2013 Article IV consultations. The mission met with President Mahama, Vice-President Amissah-Arthur, Finance Minister Terkper, Bank of Ghana Governor Wampah, other senior officials, members of parliament, and representatives of the private sector, think tanks, trade unions, and civil society. At the end of the mission, Ms. Daseking issued the following statement: “Economic growth continued at a robust pace of 8 percent in 2012 amid rising fiscal and external imbalances. A growing public sector wage bill, costly energy subsidies, and higher interest cost, pushed the fiscal deficit to about 12 percent of GDP. The external current account deficit also widened to 12 percent of GDP, while unadjusted fuel and energy prices and a tightening of monetary policy helped keep inflation in single digits.
I would like to thank all of you for making the time from your busy schedules to be present at this year’s Ferdinand Ayim Memorial Lecture. This is my first major public statement since being selected by Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo (with the support of the National Council of the NPP) as his running mate for the December 2012 Presidential elections. I want to take this opportunity to express my profound gratitude and appreciation to Nana Akufo-Addo for the honour of reaching out again to select me to serve as his running mate, and Insha-Allah, as the Vice-President of the Republic, under an Akufo-Addo presidency. Click here for full speech
Consumer Protection Without Law
Within contract law, the plight of consumers is often regarded as a basis for enhancing contract enforcement and of bolstering the access of consumers to breach of contract remedies. The one-way contract idea suggests that this is a misguided priority, barking up the wrong tree. Rather than paying lip service to consumers’ “vindication of rights,” “access to justice,” or the right to be informed through mandatory disclosures, this article takes the reality of non-enforcement as given and considers ways to overcome it. It is the cultivation of more potent substitutes that could help consumers. more >>>
Ghana: What Are the Implications of Ghana's Transition?
The president of Ghana, John Atta Mills, has died at the age of 68. Although few details have been released about his death, there had been speculation about his deteriorating health for some time, and he had reportedly visited the United States for medical treatment in April. President Atta Mills was approaching the end of his first term in office, having been elected in 2008. Vice President John Dramani Mahama has assumed the presidency until the next elections, scheduled for December.
The modern state of Ghana was formed in 1957 from several territorial units administered under British colonial authority. These included the Gold Coast Colony, the traditional state of Ashanti, the Northern Territories Protectorate, and the Trust Territory of British Togo land. Early nationalist movements were active primarily within the Gold Coast Colony, which had achieved some measure of indigenous participation in governmental organs by 1946. Prominent in the movement for self-government was J.B. Danquah, instrumental in the founding of the United Gold Coast Convention (UGCC) in 1946 and Kwame Nkrumah, who formed the Convention People's Party (CPP) two years later.
The Case For Free SHS
University of Cape Coast—Cape Coast. Over the last year, I, and indeed all Ghanaians have watched as Nana Akufo-Addo, the NPP Presidential candidate has taken his free SHS proposal across the length and breadth of this country. Some have questioned his rationale for it and accused him of political opportunism. Some have questioned his ability to pay for it and the fuzziness of his math in calculating the cost.