By the middle of July, the nation expects its sovereign Parliament to debate and vote on the constitutional amendment intended to change the date for holding general elections in Ghana from December 7 to November 7. Since, 1992, when the presidential election was held in November, all subsequent ones were held on December 7. The bill needs both Parliamentary Majority and Minority to agree in order to become law.

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In recent months, political parties in Ghana including the New Patriotic Party (NPP), the Convention People’s Party (CPP), the Progressive People’s Party, religious groups, the media and civil society groups such as the Let My Vote Count Alliance have made the case for urgent and honest electoral reform in the lead up to the November 2016 elections.

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Voter Validation is an exercise aimed at cleaning up the voter register, and is considered to be the only feasible solution at this stage, as a lesser alternative to compiling a whole new register.  The Electoral Commission’s Panel of Experts, the team tasked with making recommendations to Mrs Charlotte Osei and the EC leadership on how to get a credible register for 2016, has told the EC to carry out Validation, because it is at the moment the most viable option for a credible election.

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Pro –opposition Think Tank, the Danquah Institute says the Electoral Commission (EC’s) decision to use de-duplication processes to rid the voters register of multiple registration will do very little to make the current voters register credible.

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Other Stories

Government and NPA must obey court order
We have taken note of Government’s statement on the abolishing of illegal fuel price margins by the High Court. The statement is most unfortunate. In particular, the argument by Government that the removal of the illegal price top-ups will lead to higher fuel prices is deceitful. For the benefit of the public, we quote the petroleum pricing formula made pursuant to the National Petroleum Authority Act, 2005 (Act 691): more>>
Is IPAC losing its focus towards electoral transparency?
After the much anticipated need for electoral reforms in Ghana to stem the tide of voter fraud, it is beginning to look like the government has finally buckled to the wishes of common sense that the kind of voters register we have used since 1992 is redundant, retrogressive unwanted and to a large extent archaic. The wish of common sense would have been that we switched to biometric registration followed by e-voting. Somehow the government has agreed to fund the biometric registration but has curiously refused to fund the e-voting. Be that as it may the next step is to give the various political parties a clear road map to the implementation of the biometric registration.
Dzi Wo Fie Asem: Rhetoric and the Politics of Expediency
On 7th January 2011, His Excellency the President, in a face to face encounter with the media, used a proverb that has now become a household expression: Dzi wo fie asem. The incident could be considered as only a trigger for this evening’s talk, which centers on the character of political rhetoric within Ghana’s contemporary history. There appears to be a growing sensitivity to political communication in this country: specifically the norms of communication, or standards of propriety in speech comportment. There is a collective realization that the spoken word may have done a lot to shape our political fortunes. Throughout our contemporary history, the spoken word has been so important in our political life, that not only is free speech enshrined in the constitution; care has also been taken to integrate speaking regulations within governance forums, from parliamentary discourse, through discourse in the law courts, to executive discourse at cabinet meetings, and to presidential discourses of engagement
Financial Times on Nigeria: SEC interview transcript
As Nigeria’s new securities regulator, Arunma Oteh has a tough task ahead of her. Africa’s second-biggest stock market is struggling to recover from a crash that has wiped $50bn off its market capitalisation from its March 2008 peak. Allegations of foul play abound – to be probed in the investigation Ms Oteh has ordered. In her first interview with a foreign media organisation since taking up her post as director general of the Securities and Exchange Commission at the start of the year, Ms Oteh tells Tom Burgis, the FT’s West Africa correspondent, of her “transformation agenda”. more >>>
In the highly volatile world of oil and gas contracting, the common law principle that all contracts entered into should be performed in good faith, often finds itself threatened by attempts by host governments to re-negotiate contracts, and in more severe cases, attempts at expropriation or nationalisation. The basis on which states are able to do this almost unflinchingly is the international law concept of State Sovereignty. One of the ways by which international oil companies have sought cover against such situations is by the inclusion of stabilization clauses (in whatever shape or form) in international oil agreements. How can Ghana ensure that, unlike the controversies in the mining sector, the stabilisation clauses in oil contracts strike a proper balance between investor interest and national interest?
Ghana: What Are the Implications of Ghana's Transition?
The president of Ghana, John Atta Mills, has died at the age of 68. Although few details have been released about his death, there had been speculation about his deteriorating health for some time, and he had reportedly visited the United States for medical treatment in April. President Atta Mills was approaching the end of his first term in office, having been elected in 2008. Vice President John Dramani Mahama has assumed the presidency until the next elections, scheduled for December.
Expect fuel price hike soon
A recent decision by an Accra High Court could have misunderstood the use of the Ex-refinery price differential In the calculation of fuel pump prices and this may force Government to raise retail pump prices if the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) loses its appeal and Government is mandated to carry out the court order.
NDC can't buy conscience of Ghanaians - Kufuor
Former President J.A. Kufuor has accused the National Democratic Congress (NDC) of resorting to vote buying ahead of the December 7 elections and warned the party that the conscience of the Ghanaian people is not for sale. Speaking to a large number of New Patriotic Party (NPP) supporters and leading members who had braved hours of heavy downpour in Kumasi to attend a rally, Mr. Kufuor said that Ghanaians are wide awake and discerning and that they will vote the NDC out, especially because the vote buying money came from the state.
Diaspora and drug trafficking in West Africa: A case study of Ghana
In a recent, important article on West African Criminal Networks in southern Africa, Mark Shaw highlighted the need for academic research – despite the difficulty in researching crime – to provide a fuller understanding of African criminal networks, ‘not least to provide an independent and strategic overview of developments and the identification of trends’. Much of the existing literature on the trafficking of illicit narcotic drugs (cannabis, heroin, and cocaine) has been from a policy perspective, funded by agencies in consumer countries in the West. more>>>
NPA’s 10% reduction in Petroleum Prices – “Too Little” or “Too Late”?
NPA’s Arrogance or Economics? On the eve of the New Year, 2015, the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) announced a reduction in ex-pump prices of petroleum products by 10% across board. This was not without drama. Most of the headlines that followed the announcement pointed to price reduction under duress. A number of civil society organizations and political parties put pressure on NPA to reduce the prices due to reasons such as the oil price crush and relative stability in the value of the local Ghanaian currency. Some of the organizations threatened public demonstrations against NPA and the Government; a situation that was expected considering that petro-politics is a feature of petroleum pricing in most parts of the world.