Good afternoon ladies and Gentlemen of the press. Thank you for coming on such short notice.

There’s a Ghanaian saying which goes like” Obaa a onim s3 onky3 wo aware ase no, otu bankye aa, ondua” akin to saying literally; that a lady whose days in her marital home are numbered, does not bother to re-plant uprooted cassava. 

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The past eight years have been a disaster for the people of Ghana. Governance standards have slipped and the economy has struggled, making life more difficult for every Ghanaian. Our country, once held up as the gold standard, has fallen markedly behind our peers.

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A late surge in campaigning has improved the opposition's chances of victory as the economy stutters

A succession of bad elections this year in Africa – in Uganda, Gabon and Zambia – make the 7 December presidential and parliamentary elections in Ghana an important political marker for the region. In one of Africa's longest-established multi-party systems, where the electoral commission enjoys relatively high levels of trust, another set of successful elections in Ghana will send a positive signal.

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By the middle of July, the nation expects its sovereign Parliament to debate and vote on the constitutional amendment intended to change the date for holding general elections in Ghana from December 7 to November 7. Since, 1992, when the presidential election was held in November, all subsequent ones were held on December 7. The bill needs both Parliamentary Majority and Minority to agree in order to become law.

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Other Stories

Ghana - On the Ground: Outlook For Elections Following President's Death
BMI View: BMI's on-the-ground research has revealed key insight into Ghana's upcoming December 2012 elections. The ruling NDC party is likely to get some sympathy votes following the recent death of President John Atta Mills, but the new President John Mahama has got his work cut out in garnering support, with only a few months to campaign. A high proportion of voters are unsure who they will vote for, so the race remains wide open. However, the newly-formed NDP is unlikely to gain much traction.
President Obama’s Shadow on Ghana’s Elections
Ghana was the first sub-Saharan African country U.S. President Barak Obama visited in July 2009. He selected Ghana because it was a “model of good governance, democracy and strong civil society participation.” Kenyans were miffed that he did not visit his fatherland and the Nigerians smelled a rat: That his visit to Ghana was an insipid conspiracy to destabilize Nigeria. But Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka disagreed: A visit by Obama would have sanctified the putrid mess called Nigeria. He threatened to have Obama stoned if he stepped foot in the country. Mercifully, President Obama wasn’t stoned in Ghana.
Ghana Gas Company operating ‘illegally’
The Danquah Institute has stated that Ghana National Gas Company, headed by Dr George Sipa-Yankey, is operating illegally as it was not created by an Act of Parliament and currently appears to be breaching the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation Act, 1983 (PNDCL 64), which set up the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation. The Executive Director of the Danquah institute, Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko made this known at a press conference organised by the Institute and held at the Ghana International Press Centre on Wednesday 21st December 2011.
Statement on Issues with Gas Infrastructure Development
Friends of the media, the Danquah Institute called you here to the Accra International Press Centre today, Wednesday, December 21, 2011, for a very good reason. First, Ghana is positioned to be the world’s fastest growing economy this year and this has been made possible by the singular fact that 2011 marks Ghana’s maiden full year as an oil-producing economy. Beyond the lifting of crude oil, Ghana stands to build a multi-billion dollar petro-chemical industry from the monetisation of its natural gas. Click here for full statement
Ghana Sits on Borrowed Money & Borrowed Time
The World Bank Ghana Country Office’s Conference Room was the scene of lively discussions and startling revelations on Friday last week (18th June 2010). It emerged in a fascinating exchange between senior officials of the Ministry of Finance (past and present) and the country program manager of the Bank, Katherine Bain, that considerable amounts of monies approved for various projects in the country were still sitting idly in various accounts at the Ministry, several months after they were earmarked for disbursement towards critical development projects.
THE QUEST OF STX TO BUILD A BETTER KOREA WITH GHANA
I will begin this article by asking anybody interested in knowing about the various documents - agreements, MOUs, letters, etc - on the $10 billion STX proposal for Ghana to visit www.danquahinstitute.org. You may even have the opportunity to read a letter from cabinet marked confidential. This STX deal, to my knowledge, is the single costliest, unpatriotic deal that any democratic Ghanaian government has appended a signature to since that obnoxious 1960 constitution. There is an agreement before Parliament, apparently recalled by Cabinet, for a loan of $1.5 billion for Government to give to STX to build 30,000 housing units for security agencies, including 15,240 one-bedroom flats and 9,356 two-bedroom flats. STX Engineering & Construction Ghana Limited, the recently established vehicle for this project, is curiously mentioned as the lender, when it is really the lender-on. STX Corporation, the parent conglomerate, has notable liquidity issues but can certainly raise money on an off-take agreement backed by a sovereign guarantee and oil, as the agreement with the Ghanaian Government offers.
A victory for Fraud?
Unlike Nana Akufo-Addo, I am not the least bit disappointed that our Supreme Court would affirm the fraudulent declaration of Mr. John Dramani Mahama as winner of the 2012 election. (See "Akufo-Addo: 'I Disagree with SC's Verdict but I Accept'" Ghanaweb.com 8/29/13).I am not disappointed because I am also not the least bit surprised. For going into the Election 2012 Petition, I emphatically stated that unless the panel of jurists adjudicating the petition were drawn from outside Ghana, I did not see much by way of a favorable ruling for those with the most forensically sustainable evidence. And so in quite a practical sense, I have been vindicated in my prediction.
Election 2012 petition verdict: Full Judgement (9 Judges)
Although the petitioners complained about the transparency of the voters’ register and its non or belated availability before the elections, this line of their case does not seem to have been strongly pressed. In any event the evidence clearly shows that the petitioners raised no such complaint prior to the elections nor has any prejudice been shown therefrom. Indeed even in this petition the petitioners claim that the 1st petitioner was the candidate rather elected, obviously upon the same register. So also their allegations that there were irregularities and electoral malpractices which “were nothing but a deliberate, well-calculated and executed ploy or a contrivance on the part of the 1st and 2nd Respondents with the ultimate object of unlawfully assisting the 1st Respondent to win the 2012 December Presidential Elections.”
Mills and Democracy
Unfolding events in neighbouring Ivory Coast are clear manifestations of forebodings of what could happen in Ghana after Mills and his NDC have lost in the Parliamentary and Presidential elections in 2012. Mr Emile Short earlier registered his thoughts and on these likely premonitions in Ghana during and after 2012 with worried reference to events that happened in Rwanda; indeed John Mills and his government’s reactions on the Ivorian situation are clear confirmation of what everybody feels about Ghana during and after 2012.
Nigeria's Ascendant Oil Industry Faces Host of Pitfalls
Nigeria has decisively reclaimed the mantle of Africa's top oil producer, with rising output and crude prices spurring growth in the continent's most populous country. But the same industry driving the economy—oil—faces a host of challenges. In the next month, Nigeria's national assembly is expected to approve energy legislation that U.S. and European oil executives warn could curtail investment. The presidential election early next year may reignite fresh violence in the Niger Delta, the West African country's main oil region, where Royal Dutch Shell says its pipeline was attacked recently.