Good afternoon ladies and Gentlemen of the press. Thank you for coming on such short notice.

There’s a Ghanaian saying which goes like” Obaa a onim s3 onky3 wo aware ase no, otu bankye aa, ondua” akin to saying literally; that a lady whose days in her marital home are numbered, does not bother to re-plant uprooted cassava. 

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The past eight years have been a disaster for the people of Ghana. Governance standards have slipped and the economy has struggled, making life more difficult for every Ghanaian. Our country, once held up as the gold standard, has fallen markedly behind our peers.

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A late surge in campaigning has improved the opposition's chances of victory as the economy stutters

A succession of bad elections this year in Africa – in Uganda, Gabon and Zambia – make the 7 December presidential and parliamentary elections in Ghana an important political marker for the region. In one of Africa's longest-established multi-party systems, where the electoral commission enjoys relatively high levels of trust, another set of successful elections in Ghana will send a positive signal.

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By the middle of July, the nation expects its sovereign Parliament to debate and vote on the constitutional amendment intended to change the date for holding general elections in Ghana from December 7 to November 7. Since, 1992, when the presidential election was held in November, all subsequent ones were held on December 7. The bill needs both Parliamentary Majority and Minority to agree in order to become law.

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Other Stories

GHANA’S EMERGING OIL ECONOMY: - The good, the bad and the ugly
Enter December 15, 2010, commercial production of oil from Ghana’s Jubilee fields commences. The much awaited event is heralded by Ghanaians with much joy and hope…hope for an improvement in the general welfare and living standards of the average Ghanaian. Current production levels from the oil field are estimated to be approximately 55,000 barrels per day, a figure which is expected to more than double to 120,000 barrels per day within six months after the commencement of production. more >>>
Gabby: Ghana’s 2008 Election was Flawed
The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute has said that the 2008 general elections of Ghana had so many flaws and that he fears the country is not showing any serious interest in putting measures in place to avoid that in 2012. “Even though every vote was seemingly counted not every vote counted in the final analysis. And, if every vote counts then certainly not every vote was properly counted in 2008. Both parties must be blamed; but what are we doing now to cut out that cancer of electoral malpractices from our system for the future? We must wake up now, start thinking and working on it,” he urged all stakeholders.
US election: Mitt Romney's choice as running mate just made the election interesting
Mitt Romney's selection of Paul Ryan as his vice presidential running mate for the Republican ticket is proof of the former Bain executive's business pedigree: a smart CEO picks an even smarter chief financial officer. It's also proof, finally, of the former Massachusetts governor's political prowess: the race will now be about something important – a battle of economic ideas, with America's comeback as the ultimate prize promised. And that's good for the Republican Party, the Democratic Party, and the nation.
Yileh Chireh’s Strike Against Ministerial Responsibility
Wednesday, sounding rather frail, the absentee Minister of Health, gave interviews to say that no, he had not gone on leave to campaign in his constituency. He was only there to ‘interact’ as part of his medical leave. Joseph Yieleh Chireh was reacting to a report in the Chronicle that while patients were suffering under the doctors’ strike, the minister responsible was campaigning in his Wa West Constituency, Upper West Region.The Chronicle said “Mr Yieleh Chireh was at the Dabu Electoral Area in the Upper West Region on Tuesday, holding meetings with NDC executives in the constituency, in a bid to retain him to contest the [parliamentary] elections” next year.
CAO appraisal for audit of IFC on Jubilee Fields
In light of the April 2010 Macondo well blow out and oil spill events in the Gulf of Mexico, the CAO vice President initiated an investigation to assess IFC's procedures and standards when appraising investments in deepwater offshore oil and gas exploration projects. As of September 2010, IFC was involved in deepwater offshore oil and gas development of the development of the Jubilee Field in the waters offshore of Ghana. Click here for the full report
Transforming Third World Cities through Good Urban Governance: Fresh Evidence
Many Ghanaians believe that introducing multi-party elections at the metropolitan, municipal and district levels would ensure the election of competent people to manage the urban or local economy. This belief is premised on the assumption that electorates are informed and would vote for competent politicians. Using the 2008 elections in Ghana, it is argued that only a minority of electorates vote on issues; the majority vote along tribal and party lines; and based on how “humble” a politician is or simply based on monetocracy. This means that introducing elections into the local government system would not necessarily lead to a transformation of the local or urban economy; greater local democracy is not the answer to the housing problem, sanitation crisis, unemployment burden and the poverty challenge. There may be the need for a new form of local democracy. Keywords: Democracy, Urban, Governance, Ghana, Elections more >>>
Atta Mills' 4
An election year provides a platform for political parties and their leadership to engage the electorate in a conversation about the issues facing the nation and how they intend to govern. Expectedly, the party in power (incumbent) seeks to convince the electorate to stay the course. Typically, the incumbent anchors this argument by touting its achievements, if it has any, or demonstrating to the electorate that it has fulfilled its prior campaign promises. Exceptional incumbents not only showcase their achievements but they also chart a path forward.
Ghana's total debt hits $12.91 billion and going
Ghana’s total debt has doubled in just two years under President JEA Mills. Documents made available to the New Statesman from policy think tank, Danquah Institute, indicate that Ghana’s total is $12.9 billion currently. At the end of 2008, when the New Patriotic Party left office, Ghana’s domestic debt stood at GH¢4.8 billion (or $3.170bn in today’s exchange rate). At the end of 2010, under the National Democratic Congress, this had shot up to Ghc8.28bn ($5.47bn).
Stakeholders endorse Indian Electronic Voting Model
Stakeholders at the recently held conference on Biometric Voter Registration and E-Voting in Ghana overwhelmingly endorsed the Indian model of Electronic Voting as the model that is adequately suited to the Ghanaian terrain should Ghana decide to introduce technology into her elections. This was made known at the just ended 2-day conference organised by the Danquah Institute, a policy think tank based in Accra. The Conference drew participants from government, political parties, the Electoral Commission, civil society organisations, media houses, local and international experts on e-voting systems, development partners and Ghanaians interested in this subject area.
What does Kenya want?
With both the West and East now courting Nairobi, President Kenyatta must decide how to do business with allies both old and new.