By the middle of July, the nation expects its sovereign Parliament to debate and vote on the constitutional amendment intended to change the date for holding general elections in Ghana from December 7 to November 7. Since, 1992, when the presidential election was held in November, all subsequent ones were held on December 7. The bill needs both Parliamentary Majority and Minority to agree in order to become law.

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In recent months, political parties in Ghana including the New Patriotic Party (NPP), the Convention People’s Party (CPP), the Progressive People’s Party, religious groups, the media and civil society groups such as the Let My Vote Count Alliance have made the case for urgent and honest electoral reform in the lead up to the November 2016 elections.

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Voter Validation is an exercise aimed at cleaning up the voter register, and is considered to be the only feasible solution at this stage, as a lesser alternative to compiling a whole new register.  The Electoral Commission’s Panel of Experts, the team tasked with making recommendations to Mrs Charlotte Osei and the EC leadership on how to get a credible register for 2016, has told the EC to carry out Validation, because it is at the moment the most viable option for a credible election.

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Pro –opposition Think Tank, the Danquah Institute says the Electoral Commission (EC’s) decision to use de-duplication processes to rid the voters register of multiple registration will do very little to make the current voters register credible.

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Other Stories

In a provocative lecture delivered to Pennsylvania University students and professors last Monday (on the eve of Founder's Day in Ghana), Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko described Ghana's first President as the "personification of the African tragedy of the 20th century." He said, it was ironic, but pregnant with subconscious meaning that BBC listeners voted Kwame Nkrumah as Africa's man of the Millennium in December 1999.
In Summary This article offers five reasons for this conclusion: Supreme Court’s reliance on backward looking, mean-spirited, cramped Nigerian precedent. Tolerant and uncritical acceptance of the IEBC’s explanations on the voter registers. Lack of clarity about IEBC’s duty to ensure that final results could be verified against provisional results. The Court’s use of subsidiary legislation to limit the meaning of “votes cast,” an unambiguous phrase in the Constitution. The evidential foreclosure that the Court imposes on itself by taking judicial notice of technology failures instead of treating IEBC as spurious. Sadly, as the saying is, in this judgment, the Supreme Court has only given us reasons that sound good, not good, sound reasons. Read More >>>
NPP to use oil revenue to fund Free SHS policy
Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo Addo, New Patriotic Party (NPP) presidential candidate, has said under an NPP administration, oil revenue would help fund the Free Senior High School policy that he has proposed. Speaking at the final presidential debate organised by the Institute of Economic Affairs, Akufo-Addo said that, “the most equitable manner in which Ghanaians would benefit from the oil revenue is to ensure that they are used on the two most critical aspects of our national life – education and health care.
DI holds Press Conference on gas infrastructural project
The Danquah Institute is organising a news conference at the International Press Centre, Ridge, Accra, on Wednesday, December 21, 2011 at 11am prompt. The Danquah Institute will raise issues about the apparent lack of transparency in the Sinopec agreement for the gas infrastructural project, and its implications to the $3 billion CDB loan facility, and an estimated billion dollars of income losses to the state in oil and gas production as a result of policy decisions and inertia.
No Ambiguity in NPP Constitution On Election Of Flagbearer
Some highly respected members of the New Patriotic Party have been arguing that the national leadership of the party, in choosing a date for the election of the 2012 presidential candidate of the party, must stick to the letter of the party’s constitution. This is a responsible statement, ordinarily. However, their interpretation of the constitution is that the flagbearer must be chosen in (rather than by) December 2010. Some also argue, with some ostensible generosity, that the National Congress to elect the presidential candidate can be done ‘earlier’ but certainly not earlier than September 2010 because of the time the constitution provides for nominations to be filed. The fundamental canon of interpretation is that where the words of a statute have a plain and straightforward meaning and the words are reasonably capable of only one meaning that one literal meaning must be given. Thus, if a constitution’s language is plain and clear, the duty of interpretation does not arise, and the rules which are to aid doubtful meanings need no discussion.
IMANI Special Report on the STX-Ghana Deal
Introduction Since the STX-Ghana deal took its sour turn towards controversy, many people have asked us, usually privately, what a pro-market organisation such as ours is doing “opposing” a business deal that seems to benefit the private sector more than the public sector. Quite apart from the fact that such a question betrays a woeful lack of understanding of the “free market” it is also unfair to our actual position on the STX-Ghana matter.
Record Of Ghana's Historical Past
The recent inauguration of the Kobina Sekyi Memorial Lectures, in addition to the already established J.B. Danquah and Kwame Nkrumah annual lectures, provides an opportunity to draw special attention to the neglected aspects of Ghana’s political history in order to set the record straight for the younger generation. Our youth seem to have a very limited knowledge and appreciation of the background to Ghana’s independence struggle and its singular significance. We need to go beyond superficial and partisan analysis of past events to recognise the contributions made across the board to Ghana’s position in the world today.
President Kufuor To Give First Major Address In Ghana Since Leaving Office
President Kufuor To Give First Major Address In Ghana Since Leaving Office His Excellency, Mr. John Agyekum Kufuor, former President of Ghana is set to deliver his first major address in Ghana since leaving office on January 7, 2009.
Advisory Paper - Ghana Gas Sector Master Plan
As a result of the discovery of commercial volumes of hydrocarbons in 2007, the Government of Ghana set an overall goal for the enery sector focussed on the "the development and sustenance of an efficient and viable energy sector that provides secure, safe and reliable supply of enery to meet Ghana's development needs in a competitive manner." Click here for report
“He who knows only his own side of the case, knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them. But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side; if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion.” John Stuart Mill, On Liberty. Introduction to Gutter FootballYoung and aspiring footballers in Ghana often play an interesting version of the game called “Gutter-to-Gutter”. The ‘goal posts’ are literally two gutters (often wet, slimy, smelly and filthy) on either side of a road, potholed or otherwise. The aim is to play the ball into the gutter goals. Once in a while when a car approaches, the game gets suspended only to resume when the car has driven past, sometimes leaving a mixture of dust and smoke behind it. The most important item in this game is the ball, the “sock ball”.